HTML Elements

Element Name Element Tag Description

DOM - Document Object Model

The Document Object Model (DOM) is a programming interface for HTML and XML documents. It represents the structure of a document as a tree-like structure, with each node in the tree representing an element or attribute in the document. The DOM allows developers to programmatically access, manipulate, and change the content and structure of a document.

In the context of HTML, the DOM represents the structure of an HTML document as a tree of nodes, where each node represents an HTML element. The root of the tree is the <html> element, and its children are the <head> and <body> elements. The children of the <head> element are the <title>, <meta>, and <link> elements, and the children of the <body> element are the various other HTML elements that make up the content of the page.

The DOM provides a way for JavaScript and other programming languages to access and manipulate elements of an HTML document, through the use of various methods and properties of the DOM nodes. For example, the getElementById() method can be used to find a specific element in the document by its id, and the innerHTML property can be used to get or set the content of an element.

Additionally, the DOM allows you to navigate between elements, traverse the tree and add, modify or delete elements, attributes and text nodes.

In short, the Document Object Model (DOM) is a programming interface that allows web developers to access, manipulate and change the structure and content of HTML and XML documents, and it's a fundamental part of client-side web development.

HTML DOM Element Levels

In HTML, elements can be categorized into different levels based on how they are displayed on a web page. The three main levels of elements are inline, inline-block, and block elements.

Inline elements are elements that are placed inline with the text, and they only take up as much width as necessary. They do not create a new line after them and they do not take up the full width of the parent container. Examples of inline elements include the <a>, <span>, <img>, and <strong> elements. They can be used inside a sentence or a paragraph, and they can be used to style specific parts of the text.

Inline-block elements are similar to inline elements, but they can have a width and height and they can have padding and margins. They are placed inline with the text, but they can have a specific width and height, and they can be used to create small and contained blocks of content. Examples of inline-block elements include the <button> and <input> elements.

Block elements are elements that create a new line after them and they take up the full width of the parent container. Examples of block elements include the <div>, <p>, <h1>, <section>, and <form> elements. They are used to create larger and more complex blocks of content, and they can be used to create columns, sections, and other layout elements.

In summary, inline elements are good for styling small parts of text and inline-block elements are good for creating small and contained blocks of content, while block elements are good for creating larger and more complex blocks of content and layouts.